Genesis: Morality, Sexual Behaviour and Depravity

by Manfred Davidmann

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Contents

Introduction and Overview
'Nakedness' and Sexual Behaviour
Sexual Behaviour (Genesis Chapter 6: 1-2, 5)
Consequences of Wrongdoing, of Inhuman Behaviour
'Nakedness' Incident (Genesis Chapter 9: 18-27)
Sanctity of Marriage
Abram in Egypt (Pharaoh). (Chapter 12)
Abraham in Gerar (Abimelech). (Chapter 20)
Isaac in Gerar (Abimelech). (Chapter 26)
Summary
Chastity and Rape: The Story of Dinah (Genesis Chapters 33-35)
Sodomy: The Allegory of Sodom and Gomorrah (Genesis Chapters 18-19)
Incest: The Allegory of Lot's Two Daughters (Genesis Chapter 19)
Morality and Social Strength, Family and Well-being
The Pentateuch and the Problems of Our Times
Notes and References
Notes   <..>
References   {..}

Relevant Current and Associated Works

Relevant Subject Index Pages and Site Overview



Introduction and Overview

This report is one of a series which together describe and illustrate the meaning and intent of Genesis. Each is self-contained but together they provide the knowledge needed for understanding Genesis, its allegories and their significance. These allegories illustrate and define the difference between good and evil, and the importance of behaviour on social strength, well-being and good life under modern conditions.


Genesis begins by describing how the planet was created, in other words how it was formed, the changes which occurred as the planet aged, how plants and animals were formed, evolved and populated the planet. It describes how human beings evolved and also how the behaviour of life forms changed as human beings evolved.

When the Pentateuch (Torah, Five Books of Moses) was written about 3,400 years ago, people had but little knowledge about science or evolution compared with what is known today. So concepts for which we now have precise terms were described rather than stated and expressed in religious terms so that they could be appreciated and followed by the population.

Understanding this we see that there is no conflict, no contradiction, no divergence, only awe-inspiring agreement, between what is stated in Genesis and what we now know about the evolution of human beings.

See The Meaning of Genesis: Creation, Evolution and the Origin of Evil


Chapters 5 and 6 then describe the behaviour of human beings before the flood. There is no conscious knowledge of good and evil and of the difference between them and their behaviour is like that of their primitive ancestors. Their behaviour is stated and condemned as evil. These two chapters of Genesis outline evil behaviour.

Chapter 5 shows people amassing possessions and wealth and dominating others by brutal strength.
See Genesis' Secrets: Pre-flood Evils and the Social Problems of Our Time
Chapter 6 adds unrestrained sexual behaviour
See Genesis: Morality, Sexual Behaviour and Depravity
and Chapter 6 also adds the gaining and misuse of power over others.
See Genesis: Nephilim, Dominance and Liberty


The flood follows and from here onwards Genesis shows a conscious knowledge developing of good and evil, stressing consequent reward and punishment, justice and retribution.

Human beings are shown to be becoming numerous and spreading out, behaving much as before the flood. Different communities developed different customs, traditions, ways of behaving and, with the life and travels of the Patriarchs, some learned to know the difference between good and evil, learned to behave humanely.
See Genesis: Differentiating Between Good and Evil
Genesis records what is, and is not, moral sexual behaviour and the consequences of depravity. Clearly stated is that the consequences cannot be avoided.
See Genesis: Morality, Sexual Behaviour and Depravity
Genesis considers the gaining and misuse of power over others. We are told the consequences of allowing some people to misuse their abilities to manipulate, control and enslave others. And the Pentateuch states social laws of behaviour and a social system which have to be kept as they enable people to gain and keep liberty and good lives of high quality.
See Genesis: Nephilim, Dominance and Liberty


The abovementioned reports also summarise corresponding present social problems and describe the Pentateuch's social laws and social system for overcoming them.

Further relevant knowledge and information necessary for understanding the meaning of Genesis can be found in the following reports:

Meaning and Significance of the Names of God in Genesis
Describes the meaning and significance of the names of God which are used in Genesis. These are of greatest importance for understanding the meaning of the text of the Bible.

Meaning and Intent of Genesis: Essential Notes on Hebrew Grammar
Lists and illustrates the grammatical rules which help to differentiate between references to individuals and references to groups or life forms. Essential information for understanding the meaning of Genesis.

Bible Translations, Versions, Codes and Hidden Information in Bible and Talmud
Shows how changes made in the past have obscured the original intended meaning. Describes the ways in which hidden information has been encoded and labelled so that its original meaning could not be misunderstood or misinterpreted.


In this report, more detailed explanations and comments are indented as follows:

Indented explanations and comments.


'Nakedness' and Sexual Behaviour

Primitive mammals engage instinctively in sex, forming family connections, just like eating and drinking. And 'naked' is used in (Gen 2: 25) for referring to sexual behaviour between primitive male and female animals engaging instinctively in sex. <1>

'Naked' is used again, in (Gen 3: 7), for referring to sexual behaviour between male and female human beings when stating that human beings do not behave instinctively, that human beings control instinctive sexual behaviour impulses, that they control the sex urge. <2>


The human brain underlies free will, enabling us to decide independently what is good or evil, that is what to do or not to do.

Human beings learned not to behave instinctively, they learned that to be human one had to control one's instinctive sexual behaviour impulses, that human beings can control the sex urge.

It takes a long time to give birth (pregnancy) and to provide for upbringing of children to maturity. So sex has to be restrained to within the family (marriage). Human beings behaving humanely control the sex urge.

For comprehensive information on how the human mind evolved and works, see {4}

For comprehensive information about the family and how it functions and the pressures which it faces from without and from within, see {5}


Sexual Behaviour (Genesis Chapter 6: 1-2, 5)

Genesis Chapter 5 described the behaviour of the 'descendants of Seth', namely Homo sapiens, human beings. Chapter 6 continues the development by describing other aspects of the behaviour of human beings at that time.

Having detailed 'dominating, oppressing and exploiting' in Chapter 5 {10}, Genesis in Chapter 6 adds 'unrestrained sexual behaviour' as a main cause of the flood. Verses 1-2 and 5 of Chapter 6 tell much.

While the information in Chapter 6 about 'sons of God' and 'daughters of men' appears vague, is among the least understood of the passages of the Pentateuch, it deals with behaviour which underlies evil and is quoted as a direct cause of the subsequent flood.


6: 1 And it came to pass, when men began to multiply on the face of the earth, and daughters were born to them,

Hebrew ha'adam rendered 'men' but the meaning is 'life form'. {11}
In Chapter 5 the descendants 'begot sons and daughters'. But the first sentence of Chapter 6 pointedly refers to 'daughters' in general, to the female of the life form, to women.


6: 2 that the sons of God saw the daughters of men that they were fair; and they took them wives, whomsoever they choose.

'the sons of God' (Hebrew 'bene-ha'elohim':

The name Elohim used is that of God (creator), that is of God as creator of all that is good, indicating, as before, potential towards good. {1, 2}

What they have in common is that they are alike to God in their ability to understand the difference between good and evil.
Gen 3: 5 ... you shall be as God, knowing good and evil.
Gen 3: 22 ... the man is become as one of us, to know good and evil; ...

So 'sons of God' refers to the males of a life form which in itself is a development towards good, which is alike to God in its ability to understand the difference between good and evil, to human beings. {1}

In other words, 'sons of God' refers to 'men'.


'The daughters of men':

eth-benot ha'adam: The daughters of human beings. The reference is to 'daughters' in general, to the female of the life form, to women.


'that they were fair':

'fair': Hebrew 'tobboth', literally 'good'


'they took them wives, whomsoever they choose.':

This phrase is generally considered to include:

Even those married to others <3>

Even (one) wedded to a man <4>

Without restraint. Without care or consideration for the 'daughters' or other people.


The application of their abilities towards taking whomever they chose as wives is misuse of others for personal gain regardless of the feelings and welfare of other peoples, is corrupt and evil corresponding to unrestrained beastly animal behaviour from below the level of human consciousness. Beastly animal behaviour which human beings can, should and have to control. <5>


But human beings are misusing their abilities, misapplying them towards greater evil instead of towards greater good, here towards greater sexual self-gratification without care or concern for others.

It is in these first few sentences of Genesis Chapter 6 that uncontrolled sexual behaviour is added to the list of beastly behaviours carried forward by human beings from their primitive ancestors.


6: 5 And the Lord saw that the wickedness of man was great in the earth, and that every imagination of the thoughts of his heart was only evil continually.

Human beings on the whole were exploiting and misusing each other for personal gain, as described in Chapters 5 and 6 <6>. So they were almost wiped out by the flood. Noah and his family were saved because he was righteous {10}.


Consequences of Wrongdoing, of Inhuman Behaviour

Genesis has been describing evil as taking place, has been defining it in general terms. But has not been detailing evil behaviour in plain language.

Humans beings, however, are capable of comparing good with evil and of choosing good.

So why is evil not described and its cause stated in plain language? Why the secrecy, the codes, used in Chapters 5 and 6 to show that people are being exploited, oppressed and misused?

Evil has so far not been detailed because at this point, and on the whole, there is no clear realisation of what kind of behaviour is good, and thus of what is bad, evil, inhuman.

Human beings behaved just like earlier, lower, more beastly, forms of life because there was no objective knowledge of what constituted good, humane, behaviour.

People did not distinguish between humane and beastly behaviour, there were no descriptions of humane compared with beastly behaviour, no rules of behaviour to enable people to resist and overcome primitive instinctive urges.

But from now on Genesis (that is the Pentateuch) defines evil more closely, bringing it from the subconscious to the conscious level, and so enabling people to choose between good and evil. Describing evil behaviour and its serious consequences, describing what humane behaviour is and how it can be achieved.

Immediately following the flood, God is recorded (Gen 9: 9) saying 'As for Me, behold, I establish My covenant with you, and with your seed after you; ... <7>

A covenant is an agreement in which each of the parties undertakes duties and obligations towards the other. It is not a one-sided promise or obligation. {10}

And God is saying: 'As for Me, behold': On my part (as long as you do your part, as long as you behave like human beings), I ...

And God (as creator, as creator of all that is good) tells human beings that as long as they behave like human beings the planet will not be rendered uninhabitable.


And Chapter 9 of Genesis begins to describe, to make people aware of, some primitive aspects of human behaviour <7> which is shown to include the punishing of inhuman, beastlike, behaviour

From here on, Genesis and the other books of the Pentateuch contain much information about what kind of behaviour is good and righteous, about what kind of behaviour is wicked, evil, corrupt, immoral or violent, and about the resulting consequences when behaving one way or the other. {10}

And contain rules of behaviour to strengthen that which is good, to enable human beings to gain strength and have good lives of high quality in the struggle against beastliness, against evil.


The social rules (laws) of behaviour set out in the Pentateuch enable people to resist, counter and overcome primitive instinctive urges and beastlike behaviour, enable human beings to have good lives of high quality, to know the difference between good and evil and so to choose that which is good.


'Nakedness' Incident (Genesis Chapter 9: 18-27)

Commentators have concentrated their attention on guessing what Ham did to his father Noah and why Noah cursed Ham's son Canaan instead of Ham. And commentators paid much less attention to it being Noah and not God who condemns and praises his sons according to the way they behaved.

As before in Genesis, we see that a generally applicable statement is being made by a story told about individuals. In other words, this is an allegory. We are told that all human beings are the descendants of the three sons of Noah and the story is about the behaviour of human beings, and about what happens as a result.

We are told that these three people (their descendants, people) behaved in very different ways, depending on their sexual and family morality. And Noah states the consequences of their behaviour.



18 And the sons of Noah, that went forth from the ark, were Shem, and Ham, and Japheth; and Ham is the father of Canaan.

Only Canaan is mentioned of all their descendants.


19 These three were the sons of Noah, and of these was the whole earth overspread.

We are told that all human beings are the descendants of the three sons of Noah and the story is about their behaviour and what happened as a result. All human beings are descended from them and so what is being said about behaviour, and about resulting consequences, applies to all human beings. A general point is being made by a story which relates to individuals.


20 And Noah the husbandman (forefather) began, and planted a vineyard.

Hebrew 'Ish ha-adamah', literally 'man of the earth', rendered 'husbandman' in the translations.

In Gen 2: 7 the first life form 'ha-adam' is formed from the earth 'ha-adamah'. {1}

Noah similarly is the first man, all human beings who survived the flood are descended from him.

He is the righteous forefather of all human beings and 'Ish ha-adamah' should be rendered 'the forefather'.


21 And he drank of the wine, and was drunken; and he was uncovered within his tent.

22 And Ham, the father of Canaan, saw the nakedness of his father, and told his two brothers outside.

'the father of Canaan'

"Ham simply represents here the Canaanites ... and his actions symbolise the practices of the children of Canaan. There is no other possible interpretation of the expression 'the father of Canaan' (abbi: 'father of'). {9}


'Saw the nakedness of'

'Naked' has been used previously for referring to sexual behaviour between primitive animals and also to sexual behaviour between male and female human beings. <8>

'Saw the nakedness of' is found elsewhere in the Pentateuch in connection with actual sexual relations {9} <9>

In the Pentateuch, to uncover or see nakedness refers to knowing in sexual union, to sexual relations.


"The primary sin of Ham (that is of the Canaanites and those who behave like them) was his transgression against sexual morality." {9}

Sodom and Gomorrah are included in the territory of the Canaanites (Genesis 10: 19). We are informed of their sins <10> which included the same category of offences as that committed here by Ham the father of Canaan. {9}


23 And Shem and Japheth took a garment, and laid it upon both their shoulders, and went backward, and covered the nakedness of their father; and their faces were backward, and they saw not their father's nakedness.

They restrained their sex urges, behaved like human beings.


Hebrew 'vajikach', that is 'and he took'

Rendered 'took'

'The verb is in the singular, because Shem took the initiative in this matter.' <11>


24 And Noah awoke from his wine, and knew what his youngest son had done to him.


25 And he said:
Cursed be Canaan;
A servant of servants shall he be to his brethren.

It is Noah the righteous forefather who is speaking.

'The Canaanites are to suffer bondage not because of the sins of Ham, but because they themselves act like Ham, because of their own transgressions, which resembled those attributed to Ham in this allegory.' {9}

26 And he said:
Blessed be the Lord, the God of Shem;
And let Canaan be their servant.

'... the reference is not specifically to Noah's son Shem but to his descendants.' {9}

'Yhwh Eloheh' rendered 'the Lord, the God': Shem's God (as originator), who originated, caused, the humane moral behaviour of Shem (and of his descendants).

27
God (Elohim) enlarge Japheth,
And He shall dwell in the tents of Shem;
And let Canaan be their servant.

'... the reference is not specifically to Noah's son Japheth but to his descendants.' {9}

God (Elohim) enlarge Japheth: God (creator of that which is good) enlarge Japheth.

Enlarge in the sense of 'make wide', a general wish for success. {9}

'dwell in the tents of': associates and allies of the sons of Shem. {9}


28 And Noah lived after the flood three hundred and fifty years.

Japheth is the eldest. Ham was the third. Shem was consequently the second. {9} <18>

29 And all the days of Noah were nine hundred and fifty years; and he died.



This allegory is not only about abnormal sexual relations but also about abnormal sexual relations within a family. It is primitive animals who engage instinctively in sex and the allegory is about beastlike lack of control of sexual urges.


Human beings do not behave instinctively, human beings control instinctive sexual behaviour impulses, control the sex urge. Normal for human beings is an exclusive sexual relationship between husband and wife within a single life-long relationship. This ensures the young are protected for the many years it takes before they reach maturity, and protects and supports husband and wife as they grow old. {1, 5}

All other sexual relations are abnormal and we are being told the consequences of inhuman beastlike (unrestrained) sexual behaviour.


Those (Ham, Canaan) who behave immorally weaken their family and social strength, weaken themselves, are to be servants to those (Shem, Japheth) who have higher moral standards. What is to happen is that those (Shem) who initiate moral behaviour, who behave morally and humanely, gain strength and standing, and those (Japheth) who support them in this are supported in return.

Those who behave humanely, morally, can trust each other, cooperate with each other, grow, gain strength together, prosper.


This is what is taking place, this is setting the theme. The next chapter of Genesis (Chapter 10) shows how the planet is repopulated after the flood, shows people spreading out. It is following this that the record shows human beings behaving more like human beings, gaining strength and a good life of high quality accordingly.


Sanctity of Marriage

Human beings were dominating, misusing and oppressing each other for personal gain. {10}

And Gen 6: 2 added 'they took them wives, whomsoever they choose' as another main cause of the flood. They took wives without restraint. Without care or consideration for the women they took or for other people, for self-gratification regardless of feelings and welfare of others. Just like primitive mammalian animals where a wife is protected from the sexual advances of other males by the strength and power of the husband while he is alive.

Without restraint.


But then we see three stories from the travels of the patriarchs which form a connected sequence. They are linked by the key phrase <12> that in each case the patriarch is afraid of being killed by local men for the sake of his beautiful wife. That the linking is intentional is confirmed by a second key phrase, namely 'she is my sister'.

As follows:

Abram in Egypt (Pharaoh). (Chapter 12)
12: 11 ... you are a fair woman to look upon.
12: 12 ... they will kill me, but you they will keep alive.
12: 19 Why said you: She is my sister? ...

Abraham in Gerar (Abimelech). (Chapter 20)
20: 2 And Abraham said of Sarah his wife: 'She is my sister.'
20: 11 ... they will slay me for my wife's sake.

Isaac in Gerar (Abimelech). (Chapter 26)
26: 7 ... he said: 'She is my sister'; for he feared to say: 'My wife'; 'lest the men of the place should kill me for Rebekah, because she is fair to look upon.'

These stories, that is these allegories, and what they record as having been achieved, are:


Abram in Egypt (Pharaoh). (Chapter 12)

The woman had been taken by Pharaoh simply because he wanted her.

Pharaoh and his house suffer great plagues.

Pharaoh says that if he had known that she was Abram's wife he would not have taken her as his, Pharaoh's, wife.

So that

The woman is taken to serve as wife by the ruler, simply because he wants her.

And the ruler is

Forced by God to acknowledge that a married woman is outside his reach, is not to be taken, is protected.


Abraham in Gerar (Abimelech). (Chapter 20)

The ruler sends for the woman and takes her. Before he has approached her, God speaks to him.

God (Elohim) says that knowingly taking and keeping another man's wife carries the punishment of death for the sinner and all that are his. (Gen 20: 3, 7)

Taking another man's wife is a sin punishable by death.

But if it is done unknowingly and without having touched the other man's wife, the penalty may be avoided by ample compensation which the husband considers adequate.

Abimelech had been made infertile by God (Elohim) and was healed at Abraham's request (prayer) after ample compensation had been received.


Isaac in Gerar (Abimelech). (Chapter 26)

After Isaac has been there a long time, king Abimelech sees Isaac 'sporting' with Rebekah and concludes Rebekah is Isaac's wife.

And tells Isaac that if one of the people had lain with her, they would have become guilty, and lays down to the people (legislates) that who touches this man or his wife shall be put to death.


Summary

So what is recorded in these allegories as having been achieved is:

The ruler is forced by God to acknowledge that a married woman is outside his reach, is not to be taken, is protected.

God states that in general, applying to all,
The taking of another man's wife is a sin punishable by death, but that if it is done unknowingly and without having touched the other man's wife, the penalty may be avoided by ample compensation which the husband considers adequate.

Laid down, legislated, that he who touches either a husband for the sake of his wife, or his wife, shall be put to death.


Chastity and Rape: The Story of Dinah. (Genesis Chapters 33-35)

Name 'Dinah' mentioned only once in whole of Bible.
Chapter 33

Jacob came in peace to the city of Shechem, in the land of Canaan, spread his tent, bought the land on which he had settled from the children of the head of the local family.

From the children of Hamor who is referred to as 'Shechem's father'.
Chapter 34

Dinah, daughter of Jacob and Leah, went out to see the daughters of the land.

She was seen by Shechem the son of Hamor the Hivite, the prince of the land; and he took her and raped her.

Hivites: Descendants of Canaan, Canaanites. See Gen 10: 17.

Hamor asks for Dinah to be given to his son Shechem as a wife and offers whatever they wish by way of dowry and gift.

Because he had defiled Dinah their sister, the sons of Jacob answered Shechem and Hamor his father with guile, ...

and later two of the sons of Jacob, Simeon and Levi, Dinah's brothers, took each man his sword, and came upon the city unawares, and slew all the males.

'City' appears to be a settlement, apparently of one extended family.

They slew Hamor and Shechem his son with the edge of the sword, and took Dinah out of Shechem's house, and went forth.


The sons of Jacob came upon the slain, and spoiled the city, because they had defiled their sister. They took all there was including wealth, wives, children.


And Jacob said to Simeon and Levi: 'I am worried because you have made me be disliked by the local people, the Canaanites and Perizzites. I am few, they will join together against me and I and my house will be destroyed.'

To which they replied: 'Is our sister to be treated like a harlot?

'Like a harlot': Like public property (without legal protection). {3}

She is not a harlot and her wrong (the wrong done to her) must be avenged. <13>

Chapter 35

God tells Jacob to go to Beth-el ... .

Jacob asks his household to put away all strange gods and they gave him all the foreign gods they had, and the rings they had in their ears, and Jacob hid them under the terebinth which was by Shechem.

To have faith and trust the one and only God.

And the terror of God was upon the cities around them and they were not pursued.

So Jacob and his people came to Luz (Beth-el) in the land of Canaan.


So the allegory tells:

The son of a local Canaanite family raped Dinah.

Rape is so horrendous that it cannot be made good, cannot be undone, by payment of large dowry, gift and subsequent marriage.

The extended family is held responsible for an act of rape committed by one of its members.

Note the severe penalty for rape, including those who condoned what had happened and whose sole concern appears to have been material possessions and not righteousness or morality.

The punishment is death for the male members of the extended family of the rapist, the dissolution and end of their family and households.

Because of the immorality of behaviour taught and practised by the family, community, its members.

A clear way of stating

the importance of chastity,

that human beings can and do control their sexual urges,

the importance and necessity for the human male to control the beastlike sexual urge lurking at the border of the conscious.


Sodomy: The Allegory of Sodom and Gomorrah (Genesis Chapters 18-19)

Lot had moved his tent to, dwelt at, Sodom (Gen 13: 12). Sodom and Gomorrah were in the territory of the Canaanites (Gen 10: 19) and the men of Sodom were wicked and sinned greatly (Gen 13: 13).

So God said to Abraham: Look around you in all directions. All the land you see, the territory of the Canaanites, I will give to you, and to your seed, for ever. (Gen 13: 14-15)

Hebrew name used here for God is Yhwh meaning 'this is happening, this is so' {2}

In other words, they (the Canaanites) are getting weaker, you (Abraham) are getting stronger.

But always understood, implied: If, and as long as, you follow the word of God, behave like human beings; And as long as you struggle for God and people.


Concerning Sodom, God tells Abraham what He is doing (Gen 18: 17-19), because Abraham's descendants will surely become a mighty nation and a source of blessing to all the people of the earth.

Hebrew name used here for God is Yhwh meaning 'this is happening, this is so' {2}
That is, Abraham's household and descendants need to be told and taught to keep the way of the Lord (Yhwh), to do righteousness and justice; to the end that the Lord (Yhwh) may bring upon Abraham that which He has spoken of, namely to become a mighty nation and a source of blessing to all people.


In other words, Abraham is being told by God what is going to happen, and why, so that others and future generations can be told and taught how to behave in God's ways, that is how to behave like human beings, so as to gain strength and prosper, so as to avoid being destroyed.


Abraham, addressing God as 'Judge of all the earth' (Gen 18: 25) and as 'Master' (Gen 18: 32), then adds a plea for justice and mercy, for forgiving if there are a sufficient number of righteous people living among the wicked, for not slaying the righteous among the wicked as if they were wicked. (Gen 18: 23-32)

Abraham here refers to God as 'Master' thus emphasising that it is God who decides. (Gen 18: 32)

Hebrew word 'ladonaj, meaning 'the master' but translated as 'the Lord'

God agrees that the punishment should be according to the extent of the corruption. But the final determination rests with God, it is God who decides the punishment (Gen 18: 32). <14>


In the next chapter of Genesis (Chapter 19) we are told that Lot has hospitably asked two male travellers to stay in his house for the night.

But all the men of Sodom gather round Lot's house and demand that the two strangers be handed to them 'that we may know them' by sodomy.

'that we may know them': That is, vent our lust upon them by sodomy. {3} <15>

Lot tries to dissuade them and offers them his two virgin daughters instead, a most unlikely gesture. The men reject the offer and continue to press for the two strangers to be handed over to them.

The offer and its rejection is intended to emphasise that the men had been corrupted by the practice of sodomy and were lusting for it, that is were addicted to it. Their sin was the practice of sodomy and they were being punished for the practice of sodomy.

Lot is warned to escape for his life before the place is destroyed. His sons-in-law ignore the warning but Lot escapes with his immediate family to Zoar.

Sodom and Gomorrah and their inhabitants, the plain and the plants which grew, were overthrown. Destroyed, devoid of life.


When God destroyed the cities of the Plain, God remembered Abraham (see abovementioned plea by Abraham on behalf of the righteous), and sent Lot out of the midst of the overthrow, when He overthrew the cities in which Lot dwelt.

The society had been corrupted by sodomy. The level of corruption had been such that God decided to destroy the place and its inhabitants <16>. The righteous were advised to escape. Those escaped who believed the warning.


Incest: The Allegory of Lot's Two Daughters (Genesis Chapter 19)

Alone with their father and isolated from male human beings, the two daughters separately have sexual intercourse with their father when he is too drunk to be aware of what is happening, so as to ensure the continuation of his family (seed).

Each gave birth to a son.

The older daughter called her son Moab and we are told that his descendants are the Moabites (Gen 19: 37).

The younger called her son Ben-ammi and we are told that his descendants are the 'children of Ammon'. (Gen 19: 38)


Sexual union between close members of the same family, between people too closely related to marry each other, is called incest.

The name Moab indicates the child's origin as being 'from my father', by similarity of words. <17>

The name Ben-ammi veils the child's origin in anonymity as it means 'a son of my people'. <17>

So we are being told that incest is incest regardless of whether it is done openly or secretly.


Also stated are the consequences of incest and they are severe. The descendants of an Ammonite or a Moabite are excluded from the 'assembly of the Lord' for ten generations. (Deut 23: 4)

'assembly of the Lord': Community
For comparison, after the exodus from Egypt and in the same chapter of Deuteronomy, we see 'Do not detest an Egyptian, because you were a stranger in his land'. After so many years of enslavement, the descendants of an Egyptian are also excluded from the 'assembly of the Lord', but only to the third generation. (Deut 23: 8-9)


Morality and Social Strength, Family and Well-being

What we have seen is that Genesis shows human beings becoming aware of the existence of good and evil and of the difference between them, is about human beings learning to choose that which is good and gaining social strength and good lives of high quality as a result.

It is about human beings struggling to stop behaving like our beastlike primitive ancestors and instead doing what is good, learning to behave like human beings, to behave humanely.

And underlying humane behaviour is the need, the necessity, to control the sex impulse. And so this report is about morality and about the struggle to achieve this so as to achieve good lives of high quality.

Which in turn points to those extraordinary inhuman brutalising influences we are struggling against and to the consequent great need to know what is good and what is evil. So that we can choose that which is good because it will give us strength to achieve good lives of high quality and to struggle successfully against that which is evil.


And what we have in the Pentateuch are rules of behaviour which point to the essence of humane behaviour. We know that ignoring them results in social corruption, oppression and exploitation of the many by the few. And we know that following these rules ensures social strength and a good life for all. {7}


Normal for human beings is an exclusive sexual relationship between husband and wife within a single life-long relationship which ensures the young are protected for the many years before they reach maturity, and which protects and supports husband and wife as they grow old. {1, 5}

Those who behave humanely, morally, can trust each other, cooperate with each other, grow, gain strength together, prosper.


All other sexual relations are abnormal and we are told (Chapter 9) the effects (consequences) of inhuman beastlike (unrestrained, uncontrolled) sexual behaviour.

Those who behave immorally weaken their family and social strength, will need to serve and be dependent on those who have higher moral standards. Those who initiate moral behaviour, who behave morally and humanely, gain strength and standing, and those who support them in this are supported in return.

Confirmed by history {7, 8}, we see it taking place all around us.


And we saw that when the planet was repopulated after the flood that people continued to behave much as before. But then there were those who began to distinguish between good and evil, between humane and beastlike unrestrained behaviour. {12}


From the travels of the patriarchs we saw that

No man may take another man's wife. He who touches either a husband for the sake of his wife, or his wife, is punished with utmost severity.

Rape is horrendous, cannot be made good, cannot be undone. The rapist's extended family is held responsible for an act of rape committed by one of its members, because of the morality of behaviour taught and practised by family, community, its members. And an act of rape is also punished with utmost severity.

And in this way sexual relations outside marriage were prohibited before and during marriage.

A clear way of stating

the importance of chastity,

that human beings can and do control their sexual urges,

the importance and necessity for the human male to control the beastlike sexual urge lurking at the border of the conscious.

And on marriage the male accepts responsibility for the resulting family for life.


Sodomy, having sexual relations between persons of the same sex, is unnatural and abnormal, corrupting and destructive of human society and humane behaviour, is punished with utmost severity.


And incest, having sexual relations between members of a close or extended family, is abnormal, corrupting and destructive of family trust, family life and family strength. Incest is primitive beastlike behaviour and perpetrators are punished with utmost severity.



The Pentateuch contains detailed statements about what constitutes abnormal, promiscuous, adulterous sexual relations and prostitution, with associated comments and severe penalties, largely in Leviticus.


The Pentateuch and the Problems of Our Times

The Pentateuch legislates in detail, stating what needs to be done and what is prohibited, by positive and negative rules of behaviour. Positive rules point the way ahead towards greater strength and liberty, negative rules (prohibitions) protect people from the antisocial behaviour of others, safeguard the people's strength and liberty. {8}

The Pentateuch's warnings, punishments and penalties concerning morality are in most cases to the male. It is males who are behind the corrupting of family morality and who are attempting to brutalise women so as to make women more readily available for sex. Even brainwashing and manipulating women into making themselves available. With consequent weakening and breaking up of family, society and quality of life. {5}


Conditioning, persuading, inducing or compelling a person to have sex before marriage, person to person or through the media, is an act of rape.

The younger the person, the worse is the offence.

Morality has to be protected by punishing immorality, by protecting women and punishing men who behave immorally. By punishing those who do not restrain their sex urges. By punishing those who spread immorality and seduce others into immoral behaviour.


The consequences of immorality cannot be avoided. {7} <16>

In democracies or when people are struggling for their liberty, authoritarians condone and promote promiscuity so as to weaken the family and weaken the population. People are subjected to conditioning towards immorality to weaken the working population to make them easier to exploit, and to weaken the society to weaken democracy. <19>

When in totalitarian control, dictatorships of left or right or religious hierarchies then pedal back to gain strength for their people, so that they will fight for and protect, and slave for, their manipulating rulers. <20>


Hence the importance of morality, of Pentateuch morality and laws of behaviour, of protecting communities and people by restraining immoral behaviour, conditioning and propaganda, by appropriately punishing the perpetrators.



Notes and References


Notes

< 1>     In {1} see 'Evolution towards Good (Gen 2: 15-25)'
     
< 2>   In {1} see 'Further Evolution towards Good' (Gen 3: 1-7)'
     
< 3>   Soncino {6} quoting Nachmanides
     
< 4>   Rashi {3} quoting Bereshith Rabbah (Midrash Rabbah to Genesis)
     
< 5>   In {1} see 'Cain and Abel (Genesis Chapter 4)', Comments to (4: 7).
     
< 6>   See {10} for information on Chapter 5. See {13} for information on (Gen 6: 3-4).
     
< 7>   In {10} see 'Behaviour and Consequences (Genesis Chapter 9, v 1-17)'
     
< 8>   See 'Nakedness and Sexual Behaviour'
     
< 9>   Cassuto lists 'Lev 20: 10-24, particularly 11, 13 and 20'
     
<10>   Cassuto lists 'Gen 13: 13; 18: 20-; 19: 1-, particularly Gen 19: 5'
     
<11>   Soncino {6} quoting Rashi {3}
     
<12>   For more information about key phrases see {14}
     
<13>   Soncino {6} quoting Sforno
     
<14>   The inevitable consequences of wrongdoing, of inhuman behaviour, are detailed later in the Pentateuch. See {7} on 'Cause-and-Effect Relationship.
     
<15>   Soncino {6} quoting Rashi, Ibn Ezra, Rashbam
     
<16>   In {7} see 'Cause-and-Effect Relationship'.
     
<17>   Soncino {6} on v37-38 (based on Rashi)
     
<18>   See Gen 10: 21
     
<19>   See {5}
     
<20>   See {13}


References

{ 1}     The Meaning of Genesis: Creation, Evolution and the Origin of Evil
http://www.solhaam.org/
Manfred Davidmann
     
{ 2}   Meaning and Significance of the Names of God in Genesis
http://www.solhaam.org/
Manfred Davidmann
     
{ 3}   Rashi The Pentateuch and Rashi's Commentary
S. S. & R. Publishing Company, Inc.
New York, 1949
     
{ 4}   How the Human Brain Developed and How the Human Mind Works
http://www.solhaam.org/
Manfred Davidmann
     
{ 5}   Family, Sex and the Individual; Women's Liberation, Feminism and Community
http://www.solhaam.org/
Manfred Davidmann
     
{ 6}   Soncino The Soncino Chumash
Edited by Rev. Dr. A. Cohen
Soncino Press, 1947.
     
{ 7}   Struggle for Freedom: The Social Cause-and-Effect Relationship
http://www.solhaam.org/
Manfred Davidmann
     
{ 8}   History Speaks: Monarchy, Exile and Maccabees
http://www.solhaam.org/
Manfred Davidmann
     
{ 9}   Cassuto A Commentary on the Book of Genesis.
Part 1: From Adam to Noah;
Part 2: From Noah to Abraham.
By U. Cassuto (1944)
Translated from the Hebrew by Israel Abrahams (1961)
The Magnes Press, The Hebrew University, Jerusalem.
     
{10}   Genesis' Secrets: Pre-flood Evils and the Social Problems of Our Time
http://www.solhaam.org/
Manfred Davidmann
     
{11}   Meaning and Intent of Genesis: Essential Notes on Hebrew Grammar
http://www.solhaam.org/
Manfred Davidmann
     
{12}   Genesis: Differentiating Between Good and Evil
http://www.solhaam.org/
Manfred Davidmann
     
{13}   Genesis: Nephilim, Dominance and Liberty
http://www.solhaam.org/
Manfred Davidmann
     
{14}   Bible Translations, Versions, Codes and Hidden Information in Bible and Talmud
http://www.solhaam.org/
Manfred Davidmann



Relevant Current and Associated Works

Other relevant current and associated reports by Manfred Davidmann:
     
     
Title   Description
     
Struggle for Freedom: The Social Cause-and-Effect Relationship   Major review and analysis of the social laws and social system of the Torah and of the Social Cause-and-Effect Relationship. Also reviews the role of religion and of Judaism under modern conditions.
     
History Speaks: Monarchy, Exile and Maccabees   Major review and analysis of Jewish history, of King Solomon's reign and of the Maccabean dynasty, locating the causes of subsequent defeat of the people and loss of country. Covers Jewish belief and practice, social conditions and government.
     
How the Human Brain Developed and How the Human Mind Works   Describes clearly what happens while sleeping, role of dreaming, meaning of dreams. Functioning of the two halves of the human brain is related to the autonomic nervous and the immune systems. Shows how human behaviour is affected by primitive instincts.
     
Family, Sex and the Individual; Women's Liberation, Feminism and Community   This report investigates casual sex and its effects on individuals, family and community. It examines the role of the family in bringing up children and relates dominance and confrontation within the family to that in the working environment.
     
The Right to the Land of Israel   This report proves that the right to the land in which one lives, that is the strength and success of a people, depends on how people behave towards each other. This applies to all. The history of the Jewish people provides a convincing example.

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Relevant Subject Index Pages and Site Overview


The Site Overview page has links to all individual Subject Index Pages which between them list the works by Manfred Davidmann which are available on the Internet, with short descriptions and links for downloading.

To see the Site Overview page, click Overview

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Copyright    ©    January 2001    Manfred Davidmann
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History
10/01/01 Work Completed
30/05/01 To Website